Narration of Japanese Culture on Thai Television Documentary

Main Article Content

Pannawatt Bumroong

Abstract

         It’s found that the contents reflect their producers’ intentions. If the intent is to present travel opportunities, the focus is on Japanese cultural products (ex: architecture and food), if the intent is to enlighten Thai audiences, the focus is on Japanese cultural ideals (for example, mannerism and ideology). Moreover, producers have a mindset of inferiority, so most content is in a positive aspect.


         Sponsors from Japan have a far-reaching influence on a for-profit producer from the production process to contents, but nonprofit producers face more difficulties in production (ex. Filming permits, budget, or interview appointment). Nevertheless, the documentary is not profitable in Thailand so producers are required to have other kinds of content to make ends meet.

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Research Article

References

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